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Presidential Inauguration

Follow live coverage from the Associated Press.

  • Video of Obama taking public oath of office

    21 Jan. 12:41 p.m. EST

    Placing his hand on two Bibles, one used by President Abraham Lincoln at his first Inauguration and one used by the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., President Barack Obama took a public oath of office.
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 21, 2013 at 12:34 PM

  • Inauguration IQ

    21 Jan. 12:47 p.m. EST


    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 18, 2013 at 5:53 PM


  • Tweeting the inauguration

    21 Jan. 1 p.m. EST

    Some stats from Twitter on the most-tweeted moments of the swearing-in
    Peak #Inaug2013 Moment: "We cannot mistake absolutism for principle...name calling as a substitute for debate." — 27,795 Tweets per minute.
    Twitter Governmentvia twitter on Jan 21, 2013 at 12:47 PM

    1.1 Million #Inauguration -related Tweets during #Inaug2013 ceremony. Total for 2009 = ~82k.
    Twitter Governmentvia twitter on Jan 21, 2013 at 12:47 PM

    18,712 #Inauguration-related Tweets per min as @BarackObama sworn in at #Inaug2013. Oath of Office in 2009 was 3,210 TPM.
    Twitter Governmentvia twitter on Jan 21, 2013 at 12:47 PM


  • Mmm ... What's for lunch?

    21 Jan. 1:04 p.m. EST
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 18, 2013 at 3:59 PM

    Inaugural planners say a luncheon for 200 congressional leaders, Cabinet members, Supreme Court justices, and others, after the public swearing-in ceremony will feature:


    • Steamed lobster
    • New England clam chowder
    • Horseradish cake
    • Red potato
    • Hickory grilled bison with wild huckleberry reduction
    • Dessert of apple pie, ice cream, cheese and honey


  • Video of Obama delivering 2nd inaugural speech

    21 Jan. 1:11 p.m. EST

    President Barack Obama delivers his second inaugural address, saying that the inalienable rights set out in the Declaration of Independence may be self-evident but 'they've never been self-executed.'
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 21, 2013 at 1:06 PM


    In his inaugural address, President Barack Obama says enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. But he said the U.S. will defend itself through 'strengths of arms and rule of law.'
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 21, 2013 at 1:02 PM

  • Another swearing-in stumble

    21 Jan.  1:20 p.m EST


    Chief Justice John Roberts got it right this time -- but President Barack Obama appeared to stumble over the word "states" during his ceremonial swearing in.

    In front of hundreds of thousands gathered to watch, Obama stammered briefly over "states" as he repeated back the words "the office of president of the United States."


    Obama had already been officially sworn in for a second term on Sunday, in accordance with the Constitution, which requires presidential terms to begin on Jan.
    20.

    In 2009, it was Roberts who famously flubbed Obama's official swearing in.
    As a result of that mistake, Roberts and Obama repeated the presidential oath in a private ceremony to ensure there were no constitutional issues.
    President Barack Obama's family watches during the ceremonial swearing-in at the U.S. Capitol during the 57th Presidential Inauguration in Washington, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
    by Kellen Henry on Jan 21, 2013 at 12:00 PM



  • For some, a quick exit

    21 Jan. 1:22 p.m. EST

    Small streams of people began leaving the National Mall right after President Barack Obama took the oath of office, not staying to hear his inaugural speech.
    Some were making a quick exit to find a good spot along the parade route, while others wanted to get on Metrorail before the trains got too crowded.

    "You make me feel bad," said Twanda Rhodes of Longwood, Fla.
    , when asked why she was leaving. "But it's cold, and we have to catch a train."

    _ Richard Lardner, AP reporter covering foreign affairs and defense on Capitol Hill
    A crowd fills up the National Mall before at the ceremonial swearing-in of President Barack Obama at the U.S. Capitol during the 57th Presidential Inauguration in Washington, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 1:17 PM


  • The 2nd time, a more intimate affair

    21 Jan. 1:24 p.m. EST
    The U.S. Capitol on Inauguration Day. AP Photo/Caleb Jones
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 12:07 PM
    It was altogether a more intimate affair than four years ago. Just a party of untold hundred thousands, chilling in the nation's backyard.

    No match for the staggering masses and adrenaline-pumping energy of his first turn as president on the West Front of the Capitol. But a lively second act.

    Sharon Davis of Suitland, Md., retired after 22 years in the Air Force, said it all made her proud beyond words. "There's a lot of energy here today," she said. "But it doesn't compare to last time, when it was just off the charts."

    _ Calvin Woodward, AP political reporter

  • What's in the words?

    21 Jan. 1:26 p.m. EST

    President Barack Obama's second inaugural address was so broad that in 2,114 words, he repeated only three words more than a dozen times and those words themselves weren't exactly telling but geared toward future collective action.

    The word Obama used most, except for common articles:

    will – 21 times

    us – 20 times

    must – 16 times

    people – 11 times

    •  time – 10 times

    America – 8 times

    together – 7 times 

    country – 7 times 

    make – 7 times.

    Obama was slightly less verbose than four years ago when his speech had 2,385 words, but he emphasized the same words in both addresses. He said "us" 23 times, "will" 17 times, "nation" 12 times, "new" 11 times and "America" nine times.

    Here's a look at some of the common keywords and themes that run through U.S. inaugural addresses since 1900:

    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 17, 2013 at 2:30 PM




  • Americans weigh in on Obama's 2nd term

    21 Jan. 1:35 p.m. EST


    “I think that because of the reluctance of both parties to bring about bipartisan action toward the economy _ certainly everybody is affected by the economy _ I look forward to him bringing the Republicans and Democrats together.  ... I look forward to him bringing about compromising.
    – Beniam Fantu, 34, of Dallas.


    "There are no coincidences. I don't believe there are. This was exactly what was intended, to show how far we have come in our civil freedoms and in our civil rights."
    – Alenda Young, 39, of Chicago, on the inauguration ceremony occurring on Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Young is president of the Monarch Awards Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Xi NU Omega chapter.


    "I think he's a great man. He's trying his best. He did a lot his last period as I think he's going to do a lot more in his next four years."
    – Karen Espinoza, 24, was working at a Hispanic market in Little Rock, Ark., as Obama addressed the nation Monday. She didn't hear the president's speech, but said she was impressed by Obama's efforts on immigration reform.


  • Miss America bundles up, doesn't bail on inauguration

    21 Jan. 1:37  p.m. EST

    Miss America 2013 Mallory Hagan arrives at the OurTime.org Inaugural Youth Ball Generation Now Party on Saturday, Jan. 19, 2013, in Washington. (Photo by Nick Wass/Invision/AP)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 1:32 PM
    Miss America Mallory Hagan says she made it to the inauguration despite the chilly weather.

    In an interview Saturday, Hagan had said she wasn't sure if she would attend President Barack Obama's public swearing-in ceremony Monday even though she had a ticket because "it's going to be freezing."


    But on Monday she tweeted a photo of herself from the inauguration wrapped in a blue scarf with the words "bundled up!" She later tweeted that she was "proud to be an American."


    Hagan, a 23-year-old Alabama native who lives in New York, won the Miss America title earlier this month.

    _ Mesfin Fekadu, AP entertainment reporter



  • A reminder of the dangers facing Obama's 2nd term

    21 Jan. 1:41 p.m. EST

    Sally Buzbee, AP's Washington bureau chief, provides this micro-analysis:


    On this day, bad news came before ceremony.


    Little more than an hour before the public version of President Barack Obama's second inaugural, there was a sobering reminder of the risks that he and the nation face in the next four years: A U.
    S. official confirmed that a total of three Americans had been killed in a brutal hostage taking by Islamic militants in the north African country of Algeria. Seven other Americans working at the plant where the hostage standoff occurred were unharmed.
    Algerian firemen carry a coffin containing a person killed during the gas facility hostage situation at the morgue in Ain Amenas, Algeria, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013. At least 81 people have been reported dead, including 32 Islamist militants, after a bloody, four-day hostage situation at Algeria's remote Ain Amenas natural gas plant. (AP Photo/Anis Belghoul)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 1:24 PM
    One of Obama's biggest first-term accomplishments, of course, was the killing of Osama bin Laden, the al-Qaida leader who spearheaded the 9-11 attacks. But another al-Qaida offshoot, this one in Muslim north Africa, has been causing growing worries in the past year. Those militants have made a run at controlling the country of Mali, beaten partly back by the French. And last week, they showed a new aggressiveness, attacking the plant full of American and other foreign workers on the edge of the Sahara in Algeria, next to Mali.

    There's no question that the loosening of political repression in the Middle East the last few years 
    the Arab spring has also let loose the chance of fewer dictators controlling local extremist movements. Africa may seem far away to most Americans but so was Afghanistan and the al-Qaida threat there before 9-11.

    A sharp reminder that it's still a dangerous world, and Obama and the nation could face threats in the next four years that, right now, seem remote.


  • 'I'm not going to see this again'

    21 Jan. 1:46 p.m. EST
    President Barack Obama pauses with his escorts before walking through the Lower West Terrace Door on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Jan. 21, 201, for his ceremonial swearing-in ceremony during the 57th Presidential Inauguration. (AP Photo/Jonathan Ernst, Pool)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 1:42 PM
    As second-term President Barack Obama exited the inaugural platform and headed back into the Capitol, he stopped and turned around to look back at the scene and savor the view. It was hard to determine what he said at first, but a review of the tape produced this:

    "I want to take a look, one more time.
    I'm not going to see this again."

    _ Nancy Benac
    , AP reporter covering government and politics in Washington


  • Obama's 2nd inauguration speech visualized

    21 Jan. 1:59 p.m. EST
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 21, 2013 at 1:53 PM


  • First on the agenda: Nominate cabinet

    21 Jan. 2:07 p.m.

    Minutes after his inauguration speech Monday, President Barack Obama signed documents officially submitting top administration nominations to the Senate.


    Obama affirmed the nominations of:

    • John Brennan to be CIA director
    • former Sen. Chuck Hagel for defense secretary
    • Sen. John Kerry to be secretary of state
    • Jack Lew for treasury secretary

    Obama also signed a proclamation to commemorate the inauguration.
    The proclamation is entitled "National Day of Hope and Resolve, 2013."

    "I'm proclaiming peace on Earth and goodwill towards men," Obama quipped as he signed the document.


    _ Stephen Ohlemacher, AP reporter in Washington


    Nominations for Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass. to be named Secretary of State, left, and for White House Chief of Staff Jacob Lew to be named Treasury Secretary, right, bear President Barack Obama's signature after the president signed them on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013, following the president's ceremonial swearing-in during the 57th Presidential Inauguration. (AP Photo/Jonathan Ernst, Pool)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 1:55 PM


  • Presidential inaugurations: 1789-1893

    Jan. 21 2:12 p.m. EST
    APRIL 30, 1789: This Currier and Ives print is a reproduction of the scene at Old City Hall in New York as George Washington took oath of office. Left to Right : in foreground, Alexander Hamilton; Chancellor Livingston who administered the oath; Roger Sherman; secretary Otis of the Senate; Washington; John Adams; Baron Stueben; and General Knox. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:31 PM
    MARCH 4, 1829: This artist's rendition shows the crush of people after President Andrew Jackson's inaugural ceremony, held on the East Portico of the Capitol building for the first time, in Washington, D.C.. Following the inaugural proceedings, more than 20,000 well-wishers came to the White House to meet President Jackson. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:33 PM
    MARCH 4, 1841: This is an artist's impression of President William Henry Harrison's inauguration in Washington, D.C. Harrison declined the offer of a closed carriage and rode on horseback to the Capitol, braving cold temperatures and a northeast wind. After speaking for more than an hour, he returned to the White House on horseback, catching a chill that eventually turned to pneumonia. He died a month later. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:35 PM
    MARCH 4, 1857: President James Buchanan delivers his address after being sworn in as the 15th president of the United States in front of the Capitol in Washington, D.C.. The oath was administered by Chief Justice Roger B. Taney. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:39 PM
    MARCH 4, 1861: U.S. President Abraham Lincoln stands under cover at center of the Capitol steps during his inauguration in Washington, D.C.. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:41 PM
    MARCH 4, 1865: Abraham Lincoln's second inauguration is depicted in this painting as he takes the oath of office as the 16th president of the United States in front of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. The oath is administered by Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:43 PM
    MARCH 4, 1869: Ulysses S. Grant takes the oath of office as the 18th President of the United States. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:44 PM
    MARCH 5, 1877: The public inauguration of Rutherford B. Hayes takes place in front of the U.S. Capitol on the East Portico in Washington, D.C. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:46 PM
    MARCH 4, 1881: President James A. Garfield takes the oath of office administered by Supreme Court Justice Noah H. Swayne. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:47 PM
    MARCH 4, 1889: Benjamin Harrison is sworn in as the 23rd president of the United States as he takes the oath of office administered by Chief Justice Melville W. Fuller on the east portico of the Capitol building in Washington, D.C. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:57 PM
    MARCH 4, 1893: President Grover Cleveland reads his inaugural address from the steps of the Capitol building in Washington, D.C. President Cleveland was sworn in as the 24th president of the United States in a ceremony administered by Chief Justice Melville W. Fuller. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 4:09 PM
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  • AP PHOTOS: Presidential shades of gray

    21 Jan. 2:23 p.m. EST

    How much does four years in the Oval Office age the follicles? Here's a look at shifting shades of the three most recent presidents: 

     President Barack Obama at the beginning (left) and end (right) of his first term
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 18, 2013 at 6:19 PM
    President George W. Bush in the first term (left) and second term (right) 
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 18, 2013 at 6:19 PM
    President Bill Clinton in the first term (left) and second term (right)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 18, 2013 at 6:20 PM
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  • Today's event: Real, pseudo or something else?

    21 Jan. 2:28 p.m.
    President Barack Obama speaks at the ceremonial swearing-in at the U.S. Capitol during the 57th Presidential Inauguration in Washington, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) 
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 21, 2013 at 11:50 AM


    Ted Anthony,
    AP's editor-at-large and frequent writer about American culture, looks at the meaning of today's inauguration.

    A half-century ago, Daniel J. Boorstin, one of the country's most famous historians, coined the term "pseudo-event" an event that happens for the sole purpose of being watched. "The celebration is held, photographs are taken, the occasion is widely reported," he wrote.

    That was today's presidential inauguration
    right down to the letter.

    So much of politics is a scripted affair already. Much of what is done by politicians and those who govern is designed to be "on message," to "play to the base" or "stick to the talking points." Speeches are written by five, 10, 20 people and then emerge from the mouth of one. It's hard to determine precisely what is accomplished and what is, for lack of a better term, "accomplished."

    Even in the realm of scripted affairs, though, this was noteworthy: It was the scripted version of a scripted version. A pseudo-pseudo-event. The actual inauguration took place Sunday in the relative privacy of the White House because the actual Inauguration Day fell on a Sunday. Today's public version contained thousands of people, lots of dressed-up dignitaries on stage, Supreme Court justices and an oath of office that, from a legal standpoint, meant nothing.

    When it comes to the American identity, of course, we need and savor these events. They invoke national themes and foster pride. They tell us: Continuity exists, the nation goes on. They give the president an opportunity to deliver a real message amid all the careful calibration.

    But as Americans consider this day, it's worth considering how very American, too, is the scripted event that took place in front of their capitol and on their television, video and smartphone screens. And you might ask: In the end, which one was the real event?

  • Warmer weather 2nd time around

    21 Jan. 2:33 p.m. EST

    Noon temperatures for January inaugurals:

    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 21, 2013 at 2:19 PM


  • Obama vs. Reagan: Role of the government

    21 Jan. 2:36 p.m. EST

    More analysis from
    Michael Oreskes, AP's senior managing editor for U.S. news and co-author of a book on the Constitution's role in American life:

    From the same podium where President Obama stood today, Ronald Reagan famously said that in the present crisis government is not the solution, government is the problem.
    President Barack Obama delivers his Inaugural address at the ceremonial swearing-in at the U.S. Capitol during the 57th Presidential Inauguration in Washington, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) 
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 12:31 PM
    Three decades on, emerging from another, even deeper crisis, Obama said government is, at least part of the solution.

    Americans remain skeptical of central authority and have never succumbed to the fiction that government is the total solution, he said.

    "But we have always understood that when times change, so must we; that fidelity to our founding principles requires new responses to new challenges; that preserving our individual freedoms ultimately requires collective action," Obama said.

    "For the American people can no more meet the demands of today's world by acting alone than American soldiers could have met the forces of fascism or communism with muskets and militias.
    No single person can train all the math and science teachers we'll need to equip our children for the future, or build the roads and networks and research labs that will bring new jobs and businesses to our shores.
    Ronald Reagan, 1973. (AP photo)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 12:37 PM
      Now, more than ever, we must do these things together, as one nation, and one people."

    Perhaps it is the ultimate sign of the end of the Reagan era that a president who uses a phrase like "collective action" could be re-elected.


  • Presidential inaugurations 1905-1957

    21 Jan. 2:43 p.m. EST

    MARCH 4, 1905: The inauguration of President Theodore Roosevelt. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 4:11 PM
    MARCH 4, 1909: William Howard Taft, center, wore big fur-lined overcoat when he reviewed the parade after his inauguration as president in Washington. At right is James S. Sherman, vice president of the United States, and at left Edward Hallwagon, chief of the Inaugural Committee. A whirling blizzard, featured by flashes of lighting, as well as rain, snow and a cutting wind, made it one of the roughest of all inauguration days. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 4:13 PM
    MARCH 4, 1913: Woodrow Wilson takes the oath of office for his first term of the Presidency on the East Portico at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C.. Chief Justice is Edward D. White. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 4:15 PM
    MARCH 4, 1921: The retiring 28th President Woodrow Wilson, rides with his successor, Warren Gamaliel Harding, to the latter's inauguration. Because of his weakened condition, Mr. Wilson was unable to attend the inauguration of his successor. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 4:16 PM
    MARCH 4, 1925: Calvin Coolidge, left, wears a winged collar and a muted top hat en-route to take the oath on inauguration day. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 4:19 PM
    MARCH 4, 1929: Herbert Hoover takes the oath of office in Washington, D.C. Chief Justice William H. Taft administers the oath. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 4:22 PM
    MARCH 4, 1933: President Franklin D. Roosevelt takes the oath of office from Chief Justice Charles E. Hughes at his first inauguration. At right is Herbert Hoover and behind the president is his eldest son James Roosevelt. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 8, 2013 at 12:37 PM
    JAN. 20, 1937: A crowd watches as President Franklin D. Roosevelt speaks during his second inauguration ceremony in the rain in Washington, D.C. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 8, 2013 at 1:11 PM
    JAN. 20, 1941: In this photo released by the Army Air Corps, thousands pack the Capitol plaza in Washington, D.C. to see the nation's unprecedented first third-term inaugural as President Roosevelt takes the oath under a bright winter sun. (AP Photo/Army Air Corps)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 8, 2013 at 4:30 PM
    JAN. 20, 1945: More than 7,000 people stood in the snow-covered grounds at the back of the White House to watch President Roosevelt inaugurated in Washington for his fourth term. Wartime Austerity was the keynote of the proceedings and the whole ceremony was completed in under 15 minutes.  (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 8, 2013 at 5:24 PM
    JAN. 20, 1949: President Harry S. Truman delivers the inaugural address from Capitol portico, after taking the oath of office for his first full term as chief executive. (AP Photo/Becker)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 8, 2013 at 5:27 PM
    JAN. 20, 1953: President Dwight D. Eisenhower, left, utters the prayer with which he preceded his inaugural address in Washington, D.C. At right are Vice President Richard Nixon and former President Harry Truman. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 8, 2013 at 5:30 PM
    JAN. 21, 1957: Chief justice Earl Warren assists President Dwight Eisenhower into his overcoat at the conclusion of the President's inaugural address at the Capitol in Washington, D.C. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 8, 2013 at 5:33 PM
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  • A look at Obama's approval ratings, compared to his predecessors

    21 Jan. 2:55 p.m. EST


    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 18, 2013 at 5:50 PM

  • May as well stay for the parade

    21 Jan. 2:57 p.m. EST

    As the inaugural parade was about to begin, many people trying to get home were running into problems.


    Four Metro stations are temporarily closed due to crowding: Metro Center, L'Enfant Plaza, Foggy Bottom and Federal Center SW.

    At the L'Enfant Plaza station south of the National Mall, hundreds waited outside in massive bottlenecks as police temporarily barred entry.  The line to get into the Judiciary Square station stretched a block, then wrapped around a corner.

    Meanwhile, a disabled train outside Rosslyn in northern Virginia caused delays on the Blue and Orange lines.
    And a signal problem near Van Ness is causing delays on Glenmont-bound Red Line trains headed to the Maryland suburbs.

    Metro says riders should consider grabbing lunch before trying to head home.
    Or perhaps, stay for the parade.

    _ Ben Nuckols, AP reporter in Washington

  • Images from the inauguration ... so far

    21 Jan. 3:03 p.m. EST

    Crowds fill the National Mall to watch the ceremonial swearing-in of President Barack Obama at the U.S. Capitol during the 57th Presidential Inauguration in Washington, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 21, 2013 at 2:55 PM
    Former President Bill Clinton, left, greets Defense Secretary Leon Panetta, center, during a luncheon after the ceremonial swearing-in of President Barack Obama on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013. Others are House Majority Whip Rep. Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., back left, and State Secretary Hillary Rodham Clinton. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 21, 2013 at 2:58 PM
    First lady Michelle Obama arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013, for President Barack Obama's ceremonial swearing-in ceremony during the 57th Presidential Inauguration. (AP Photo/Jonathan Ernst, Pool)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 21, 2013 at 2:42 PM
    President Barack Obama signs nominations on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013, for Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., to be named Secretary of State; White House Chief of Staff Jacob Lew to be named Treasury Secretary, former Nebraska Sen. Chuck Hagel to be Defense Secretary and John Brennan to be CIA Director, after his ceremonial swearing-in ceremony during the 57th Presidential Inauguration. (AP Photo/Jonathan Ernst, Pool)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 21, 2013 at 2:43 PM

    President Barack Obama, surrounded by Congressional leaders, signs a proclamation to commemorate the inauguration, entitled a National Day of Hope and Resolve, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013, following his ceremonial swearing-in ceremony during the 57th Presidential Inauguration. From left are, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev., Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., Vice President Joe Biden, House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Va., and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif. (AP Photo/Jonathan Ernst, Pool)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 21, 2013 at 2:47 PM
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  • Playback: Beyonce sings the National Anthem

    21 Jan. 3:07 p.m. EST
    President Barack Obama greets singer Beyonce on the West Front of the Capitol after she sang the National Anthem during the president's ceremonial swearing-in ceremony.  (AP Photo/Win McNamee, Pool) 
    by Kellen Henryon Jan 21, 2013 at 7:38 PM
    Beyonce not only drew a loud cheer from the audience for her rendition of the National Anthem. The star also received rave reviews on Twitter:

    And THAT'S why she's the No1 performer in world music.....incredible! #Beyonce #inauguration
    Piers Morganvia twitter on Jan 21, 2013 at 2:47 PM

    The hardest song in any repertoire, the National Anthem. She had to remove the in-ear monitor. It's a bear. She sang beautifully.
    BetteMidlervia twitter on Jan 21, 2013 at 2:58 PM

    Beyonce just WORKED that National Anthem! That National Anthem needs a cigarette after what she just did to it!! That was INCREDIBLE!! Wow!
    clayaikenvia twitter on Jan 21, 2013 at 2:51 PM


    In case you missed it, here's the audio of her performance:

    Beyonce sings the national anthem.
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 21, 2013 at 2:27 PM

  • What's on Obama's playlist?

    21 Jan. 3:10 p.m. EST

    The President's official inauguration playlist, released through the digital music service Spotify, includes tracks from musicians set to perform at his swearing-in festivities, as well as music by some of his favorite artists: 

    1. Stevie Wonder, "Signed, Sealed, Delivered (I'm Yours)"

    2. Beyonce, "I Was Here"

    3. Marc Anthony, "Mi Gente"

    4. Fun., "Carry On"

    5. Alicia Keys, "New Day"

    6. Brad Paisley, "Mud On The TIres"

    7. Far East Movement, Cover Drive, "Turn Up The Love"

    8. Glee Cast, "Edge Of Glory (Glee Cast Version)"

    9. James Taylor, "Your Smiling Face"

    10. John Legend, "Ordinary People"

    11. Katy Perry, "Firework"

    12. Kelly Clarkson, "Breakaway"

    13. Nick Cannon, "My Mic featuring Biz Markie"

    14. Usher, "Something Special"

    15. Walt Whitman, The Soul Children Of Chicago, "Higher And Higher"

    16. Smokey Robinson, "Get Ready"

    17. Mindless Behavior, "Future"


  • Presidential seals shine, take a beating

    21 Jan. 3:22 p.m. EST
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 16, 2013 at 2:27 PM
    For a circular seal of white, gold and blue, Inauguration Day in Washington is a day to shine.
    The presidential seal will be hanging just in front of Barack Obama for all the world to see.
    But, as AP's Lee Powell reports, the symbol made of epoxy resin and fiberglass actually gets a workout from a life on the road.


  • Behind the scenes: Who's in charge?

    21 Jan. 3:29 p.m. EST
    • The Presidential Inaugural Committee, chosen by the president-elect, handles the parade, official inaugural balls and planning for the crowds on the National Mall.
    • The Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies is responsible for the swearing-in ceremony and the traditional inaugural luncheon that follows.
    • The Joint Task Force National Capital Region coordinates the military's participation in inaugural activities. This year, that includes about 5,000 service members.
  • The world watches the inauguration

    21 Jan. 3:31 p.m. EST

    Across the U.S. and around the world, people watched the second inauguration of President Barack Obama by live video feeds. Here are images of spectators outside of Washington, D.C.:

    Juanita Abernathy, widow of civil rights leader Ralph Abernathy, celebrates while watching a live video feed of President Barack Obama's Inauguration after speaking at the Union League Club of Chicago in Chicago, Monday, Jan. 21, 2012. Ralph Abernathy was Martin Luther King's best friend and was with him from the beginning of the civil rights movement, and with him when he was killed. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 3:11 PM
    Parishioners celebrate while watching a broadcast as President Barack Obama is inaugurated following the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. holiday commemorative service at the Ebenezer Baptist Church, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 3:31 PM
    Dr. Bernice King, center, the daughter and sister of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., applaud while watching a broadcast as President Barack Obama is inaugurated following the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. holiday commemorative service at the Ebenezer Baptist Church, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 3:31 PM
    Beverly Mumford, from Lawrence, Kan, watches a broadcast of the inauguration of President Barack Obama at the Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site Monday, Jan. 21, 2013, in Topeka, Kan. The National Park Service is hosting events Monday at the Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site in Topeka to observe both the inauguration and the Martin Luther King Jr. Day federal holiday. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 3:16 PM
    Guests of American Ambassador Philip Murphy, unseen, watch the swearing-in ceremony ofUS President Barack Obama on a television screen at the guest house of the US Embassy in Berlin, Germany, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013. (AP Photo/dpa, Christian Charisius)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 3:20 PM
    Parishioners watch as President Barack Obama delivers his inauguration speech following the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. holiday commemorative service at the Ebenezer Baptist Church, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 3:18 PM
    Richard Smith watches President Barack Obama deliver his inaugural address during the ceremonial swearing-in, on a television at a Best Buy department store in Springfield, Ill., Monday, Jan. 21, 2013. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 3:09 PM
    Symone Kidd watches a broadcast of President Barack Obama's inauguration on a live video feed at the Union League Club of Chicago on Monday, Jan. 21, 2013, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 2:59 PM
    Imani Thornton 17, watches a broadcast of President Barack Obama's inauguration on a live video feed at the Union League Club of Chicago on Monday, Jan. 21, 2013, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 3:04 PM
    Visitors to the Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site watch a broadcast of the inauguration of President Barack Obama Monday, Jan. 21, 2013, in Topeka, Kan. The National Park Service is hosting events Monday at the Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site in Topeka to observe both the inauguration and the Martin Luther King Jr. Day federal holiday. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 3:14 PM
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  • Obama en route

    21 Jan.  3:33 p.m. EST


    Rolling. Inaugural parade is about to begin. #inaug2013.
    dsupervilleapvia twitter on Jan 21, 2013 at 3:26 PM
    - Darlene Superville covers the White House for The Associated Press



  • A vehicle for change: Obama gets DC 'Taxation' license plates

    21 Jan. 3:37 p.m EST

    A presidential vehicle, parked outside the White House in Washington, Saturday, Jan. 19, 2013, sports Washington's "Taxation Without Representation" license plate. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 3:33 PM
    P
    resident Barack Obama's limousine is now carrying the District of Columbia's symbolic "Taxation Without Representation" license plate, a subtle, but some say important, protest over the city's lack of a voting member in Congress, during the inauguration.

    The White House says Obama has seen firsthand "how patently unfair it is for families in D.C. to work hard, raise children and pay taxes, without having a vote in Congress."

  • Presidential parade under way

    21 Jan. 3:46 p.m. EST

    The inaugural parade is under way, with strains of American composer John Philip Sousa and `Yankee Doodle'. The motorcade is proceeding down Washington's wide boulevards as spectators line the streets and cheer. Many are straining to see inside the presidential limousine for a glimpse of the president and first lady.

    Secret  Service agents are striding alongside the slow-moving motorcade, which is rolling along the middle of Pennsylvania Avenue just blocks from the White House. The wide boulevards, cleared of all traffic and spectators, feel even more imposing and grand without their usual gridlock and stop-start
    traffic.
    President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama ride in the presidential limousine during the 57th Presidential Inauguration parade Monday, Jan. 21, 2013, in Washington. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 21, 2013 at 3:45 PM


  • Many TV networks pause for inauguration, MTV opts for "Catfish"

    21 Jan. 3:43 p.m. EST

    Richard Smith watches President Barack Obama deliver his inaugural address during the ceremonial swearing-in, on a television at a Best Buy department store in Springfield, Ill., Monday, Jan. 21, 2013. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 3:09 PM

    ABC, CBS, NBC and the cable news networks cast aside regular programming Monday to carry the ceremonial swearing-in and Obama's inaugural address. It didn't carry the same attention Obama's first inaugural did. In 2009, even ESPN and MTV covered the swearing-in. This year, ESPN stuck to talk about the upcoming Super Bowl and MTV aired "Catfish: The TV Show."

    Obama's inaugural address lasted about 18 minutes, only slightly longer than the inaugural poem, but shorter than the evaluations of on-air pundits.


    _ David Bauder, AP Television Writer

  • Presidential strut is iconic inaugural moment

    21 Jan. 3:47 p.m. EST

    Pennsylvania Avenue becomes America's red carpet on inauguration day, and
    the president and first lady are the only celebrities on it. It's a tradition that dates to President Jimmy Carter. Ronald Reagan is the only modern president to skip the walk. Reagan and his wife, Nancy, stuck their heads out of their limo's sun roof during part of the drive in 1981, and the parade for his second inauguration was canceled because of cold weather. Here's a slideshow of newly sworn in presidents making the stroll:

    President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama walk down Pennsylvania Avenue during the 57th Presidential Inauguration parade Monday, Jan. 21, 2013, in Washington. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
    by Kellen Henry on Jan 21, 2013 at 4:05 PM
    President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama on Jan. 20, 2009. (AP Photo/Doug Mills, File, Pool)
    by kmahabiron Jan 15, 2013 at 3:33 PM
    President Jimmy Carter and first lady Rosalynn Carter on Jan. 20, 1977. (AP Photo, File)
    by kmahabiron Jan 15, 2013 at 3:22 PM
    President Bill Clinton and first lady Hillary Clinton on January 20, 1993. (AP Photo/Doug Mills)
    by kmahabiron Jan 15, 2013 at 3:29 PM
    President George Bush and first lady Laura Bush on Jan. 20, 2001. (AP Photo/Doug Mills)
    by kmahabiron Jan 15, 2013 at 5:50 PM
    President George H. W. Bush and first lady Barbara Bush on Jan. 20, 1989. (AP Photo/Dennis Cook)
    by kmahabiron Jan 15, 2013 at 5:47 PM
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  • Also on parade, the Obama 'brand'

    21 Jan. 3:52 p.m. EST

    Luci Brown of South Bend, Ind., looks at the floats prepared for the 57th Presidential Inaugural Parade, Sunday, Jan. 20, 2013 in Washington. Thousands are planning to march in the 57th Presidential Inauguration parade after the ceremonial swearing-in of President Barack Obama on Monday. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 21, 2013 at 3:50 PM


    The Barack Obama "brand" was on full display along the parade route as fans waited for the president to travel from Capitol Hill to the White House.


    Many wore Obama T-shirts, ski caps, hoodies and buttons.

    One woman wrapped herself in an Obama beach towel for extra warmth.
    A popular item was the canvas tote bag with pictures of the Obama family on the front and back. Some waved small flags with Obama's likeness on them.

    _ Sam Hananel and Darlene Superville, AP reporters in Washington, D.C.

  • Inaugural poem 'One Today' by Richard Blanco

    22 Jan. 4:11 p.m. EST

    Here's an excerpt from the poem read at Obama's inauguration:


    President Barack Obama shakes hands with poet Richard Blanco during the ceremonial swearing-in. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
    by ccarlson 4:08 PM
    One sun rose on us today, kindled over our shores,

    peeking over the Smokies, greeting the faces
    of the Great Lakes, spreading a simple truth
    across the Great Plains, then charging across the Rockies.
    One light, waking up rooftops, under each one, a story
    told by our silent gestures moving behind windows.
      
    My face, your face, millions of faces in morning's mirrors,
    each one yawning to life, crescendoing into our day:
    pencil-yellow school buses, the rhythm of traffic lights,
    fruit stands: apples, limes, and oranges arrayed like rainbows
    begging our praise. Silver trucks heavy with oil or paper _
    bricks or milk, teeming over highways alongside us,
    on our way to clean tables, read ledgers, or save lives_
    to teach geometry, or ring-up groceries as my mother did
    for twenty years, so I could write this poem.
      
    All of us as vital as the one light we move through,
    the same light on blackboards with lessons for the day:
    equations to solve, history to question, or atoms imagined,
    the "I have a dream" we keep dreaming,
    or the impossible vocabulary of sorrow that won't explain
    the empty desks of twenty children marked absent
    today, and forever. Many prayers, but one light
    breathing color into stained glass windows,
    life into the faces of bronze statues, warmth
    onto the steps of our museums and park benches
    as mothers watch children slide into the day.

    One ground. Our ground, rooting us to every stalk
    of corn, every head of wheat sown by sweat
    and hands, hands gleaning coal or planting windmills
    in deserts and hilltops that keep us warm, hands
    digging trenches, routing pipes and cables, hands
    as worn as my father's cutting sugarcane
    so my brother and I could have books and shoes.

    Read the entire poem here: http://apne.ws/Wbskyf


  • Just two inaugural balls for Obama this year, but they'll be big

    21 Jan. 4:13 p.m. EST

    Obama has cut the number of inauguration night balls lower than any modern president to just two due to a struggling economy. But the celebrations will be elaborate: Around 40,000 revelers are expected to pack the pair of parties. In 2009, Obama had 10 official inaugural balls.



  • Latinos took a more prominent role in Obama's 2nd inauguration

    21 Jan. 4:16 p.m. EST

    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 18, 2013 at 3:59 PM
    Latinos had a distinct presence at this inauguration after showing their growing political influence in the 2012 election. Hispanics voted 7 to 1 for Obama over his challenger, Republican Mitt Romney, whose Hispanic support was less than any presidential candidate in 16 years.


    Some examples:

    • Eva Longoria, a co-chairwoman for Obama's campaign, hosted a salute to the president Sunday evening.
    • Antonio Banderas, Rosario Dawson, Marc Anthony and other entertainers appeared in "Latino Inaugural 2013: In Performance at the Kennedy Center." The lineup also included Prince Royce, Frankie Negron, Rita Moreno and Mario Lopez. Jose Feliciano opened the show by singing the national anthem.
    • San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro, who gave the keynote speech at last year's Democratic National Convention, also addressed the audience.
    • Justice Sonia Sotomayor, an Obama appointee who is the first Hispanic justice on the highest court, administered the oath of office Sunday morning to Vice President Joe Biden.

  • Americans weigh in on Obama's 2nd inauguration

    21 Jan. 4:18 p.m. EST

    Audrey Smith
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 21, 2013 at 4:07 PM
    Detroit, Mich. resident Audrey Smith  says she's so pleased the president's second inauguration came on the Martin Luther King Day holiday.



    Political and public policy analyst Jeremy Mayer of George Mason University says President Obama seems focused on domestic issues for his legacy, rather than foreign policy like many of his predecessors.
    Jeremy Mayer
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 21, 2013 at 4:06 PM

    Westchester County, New York, resident Gail Robinson says she wanted to make sure she witnessed President Obama's second inauguration.
    Gail Robinson
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 21, 2013 at 4:05 PM


  • Presidential inaugurations: 1961-2013

    21 Jan. 4:20 p.m. EST
    President Barack Obama speaks at his ceremonial swearing-in at the U.S. Capitol during the 57th Presidential Inauguration in Washington, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 4:15 PM
    JAN 20, 1961: U.S. President John F. Kennedy delivers his inaugural address after taking the oath of office at Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 16, 2013 at 5:19 PM
    JAN 20, 1965: U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson delivers his inaugural address  on the east portico of the Capitol building in Washington, D.C. Visible in the front row, left, is first lady Lady Bird Johnson, who held the bible as her husband took the oath of office, beginning a new tradition. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 16, 2013 at 5:25 PM
    JAN. 20, 1969: Richard M. Nixon is sworn in as the 37th president of the United States administered by Chief Justice Earl Warren during inaugural ceremonies in front of the Capitol in Washington, D.C. Shown behind Warren is former President Lyndon B. Johnson. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 16, 2013 at 5:27 PM
    JAN. 20, 1973: President Richard M. Nixon delivers his inaugural address, saying the world stands on the threshold of a new era of peace. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 16, 2013 at 5:30 PM
    AUG. 9, 1974: U.S. Chief Justice Warren Burger administers the oath of office to Gerald R. Ford as the 38th President of the United States in the East Room of the White House in Washington, D.C., following the resignation of Richard M. Nixon as chief executive. Betty Ford holds the bible at center.  (AP Photo)(AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 16, 2013 at 5:32 PM
    JAN. 20, 1977: President Jimmy Carter and First Lady Rosalynn Carter wave as they walk down Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C. after Carter was sworn in as the nation's 39th president. (AP Photo, File)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 16, 2013 at 5:34 PM


    JAN. 20, 1981: U.S. President Ronald Reagan and his wife, first lady Nancy Reagan, wave to the crowd on the west front of the Capitol building in Washington, D.C., after he was sworn in as the nation's 40th president. Applauding behind the Reagans are House Speaker Thomas P. O'Neill, left, Vice President George Bush, center, and Sen. Mark Hatfield, far right. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 16, 2013 at 5:37 PM
    JAN. 21, 1985: First Lady Nancy Reagan looks on as President Ronald Reagan is sworn in during ceremonies in the Rotunda beneath the Capitol Dome in Washington Monday. Reagan, forced indoors by a record inaugural freeze, reenacted his oath taking and sounded a second term dedication to his conservative principles. (AP Photo/Ron Edmonds)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 16, 2013 at 5:39 PM
    JAN. 20, 1989: President George Bush raises his hand as he takes the oath of office as president of the United States outside the Capitol in Washington, D.C. Vice President Dan Quayle watches from behind. (AP Photo/Ron Edmonds)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 16, 2013 at 5:41 PM
    JAN. 20, 1993: Pres. Bill Clinton gives his inaugural speech after being sworn in as president on Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C. Vice Pres. Al Gore is at right. (AP Photo/Ed Reinke)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 16, 2013 at 5:44 PM
    JAN. 20, 1997: President Clinton, Mrs. Clinton and daughter Chelsea wave as they walk down Pennsylvania Avenue to start the presidential inaugural parade. (AP Photo/Greg Gibson)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 16, 2013 at 5:47 PM
    JAN. 20, 2001: George W. Bush takes the oath of office from Chief Justice William Rehnquist to become the 43rd president in Washington, D.C. Wife Laura Bush holds the Bible and daughter Jenna watches. (AP Photo/Doug Mills)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 17, 2013 at 8:57 AM
    JAN. 20, 2005: President Bush and first lady Laura Bush walk during the inauguration parade in front of the White House in Washington, D.C. (AP Photo/Doug Mills)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 17, 2013 at 9:02 AM
    JAN. 20, 2009: The crowd on the National Mall looking from the Capitol toward the Washington Monument and Lincoln Memorial listens to the inaugural address of President Barack Obama. The inaugural drew 1.8 million. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 17, 2013 at 9:59 AM
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  • Obama's ambitious 2nd-term agenda

    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 18, 2013 at 5:27 PM
    21 Jan. 4:26 p.m. EST

    The 44th chief executive is only the 17th to win re-election, and his second-term goals are ambitious for a country where sharp political differences have produced gridlocked government in recent years.


    Restoration of the economy to full strength and pressing the worldwide campaign against terrorists sit atop the agenda. He also wants to reduce federal deficits and win immigration and gun control legislation from Congress, where Republicans control the House.

  • Taking oath on MLK Jr.'s Bible a 'great privilege'

    21 Jan. 4:29 p.m. EST
    President Barack Obama receives the oath of office from Chief Justice John Roberts at the ceremonial swearing-in at the U.S. Capitol during the 57th Presidential Inauguration in Washington, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013. First Lady Michelle Obama holds the Bible as daughters Malia and Sasha watch. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 4:23 PM
    President Barack Obama says it was a privilege to take the oath of office using a Bible that had been owned by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

    Obama paused by a statue of King in the Capitol Rotunda after a luncheon hosted by members of Congress.


    "You know this is the first time I have seen this," he said.


    King's Bible was one of two he used for the ceremonial inauguration, which took place on Martin Luther King Jr. Day.


    "I had the great privilege that the Bible we used was his Bible and they asked for it to be inscribed,"
    Obama said.
    The other Bible belonged to President Abraham Lincoln.

      

  • Obama: Memorable moments from the 1st term

    21 Jan. 4:33 p.m. EST

    President Barack Obama signs the health care reform bill at the White House on Tuesday, March 23, 2010. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
    by kmahabir on Jan 18, 2013 at 9:26 AM
    President Barack Obama signs the Don't Ask, Don't Tell Repeal Act of 2010, on Dec. 22, 2010. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
    by kmahabir on Jan 18, 2013 at 9:28 AM
    In this May 1, 2011 image released by the White House and digitally altered by the source to obscure the details of a document on the table, President Barack Obama, and others watch an update on the mission against Osama bin Laden. (AP Photo/The White House, Pete Souza)
    by kmahabir on Jan 18, 2013 at 9:32 AM
    President Barack Obama speaks in the briefing room of the White House on Oct. 21, 2011, and declares an end to the Iraq war, one of the longest and most divisive conflicts in U.S. history, announcing that all U.S. troops would be withdrawn from the country by year's end. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
    by kmahabir on Jan 18, 2013 at 10:35 AM
    U.S. President Barack Obama, his wife Michelle, and Vice President Joe Biden, and his wife Jill wave to the cheering crowd in Chicago, Ill., on Nov. 7, 2012, after winning 2nd term. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
    by kmahabir on Jan 18, 2013 at 10:17 AM
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  • Grading the president's 2nd inaugural speech

    21 Jan. 4:42 p.m. EST
    Tens of thousands of people attended President Barack Obama's second inauguration. They say they liked that his address stressed inclusiveness and success for all Americans.
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 21, 2013 at 4:26 PM



  • AP PHOTOS: Inaugural parade

    21 Jan. 4:45 p.m. EST
    President Barack Obama and Michelle Obama walk down a jam-packed Pennsylvania Avenue hand in hand, waving to the crowds.(AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
    by Kellen Henry 4:44 PM
    Khongorzul Battsengel, left, and Ariunbolor Davaatsogt both from Mongolia, take a picture of themselves as they wait for President Barack Obama in the 57th Presidential Inaugural Parade on Pennsylvania Avenue. Thousands marched during the parade after the ceremonial swearing-in of Obama. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
    A band prepares to lead President Barack Obama's inaugural parade on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013, after the president's ceremonial swearing-in ceremony. (AP Photo/New York Times, Doug Mills, Pool)
    Vice President Joe Biden and his wife, Jill, walk down Pennsylvania Avenue en route to the White House, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013, in Washington. Thousands marched during the 57th Presidential Inauguration parade after the ceremonial swearing-in of President Barack Obama. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
    President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama ride in the presidential limousine during the 57th Presidential Inauguration parade down Pennsylvania Avenue Monday, Jan. 21, 2013, in Washington. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
    President Barack Obama waves during the 57th Presidential Inaugural Parade on Pennsylvania Avenue. Thousands marched during the parade after the ceremonial swearing-in of President Barack Obama. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
    President Barack Obama waves during the 57th Presidential Inaugural Parade on Pennsylvania Avenue, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013 in Washington. Thousands marched during the parade after the ceremonial swearing-in. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
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  • How Obama's inauguration is being covered around the world:

    21 Jan. 4:53 p.m. EST
    • Al Jazeera English featured video of the inauguration, plus a comparison of Obama and President Franklin Delano Roosevelt.
    • In Germany, which had its own election this weekend, Der Spiegel topped its website with a live feed and the headline in English: "It's Showtime!" After the ceremony, it focused on the cautious mood that that had replaced the euphoria four years ago.
    • The Guardian posted the full text of Obama's speech and the top headline: President Barack Obama savors second inauguration: 'I will never see this again'
    • The English website for China's Xinxua also led with Obama's inauguration, and posted a second story with the headline: Obama rejects protracted war in second term




  • One last look

    21 Jan. 4:54 p.m. EST

    We reported earlier how President Barack Obama stopped and turned around to look back at the scene to savor the view before exiting the inaugural platform and heading back into the Capitol. Here's the video:

    As he left the stage following his second inaugural address, President Barack Obama paused for a moment to take one more look at the thousands gathered to watch.
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 21, 2013 at 4:27 PM




  • AP Coverage: Drawing the curtain on the 2013 Presidential Inauguration Live                                                                                       

    21 Jan. 4:57 p.m. EST

    President Barack Obama waves to crowd after his inaugural speech at the ceremonial swearing-in on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol during the 57th Presidential Inauguration in Washington, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013. (AP Photo/Scott Andrews, Pool)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 21, 2013 at 4:50 PM

    We're ending our real-time reportage of events today - they are now a part of the nation's historical fabric, but will likely not feature as prominently as 2009's inauguration when future generations look back.

    We had time-honored tradition, pageantry and huge crowds, but also a strong political message from the president.

    Liz Sidoti, AP's national politics editor, looks back on the day and assesses what we learned and what lies ahead in the second term:

    "At the outset of a second term, this is an empowered Barack Obama _ one who made clear that he knows he has political capital, and that he plans to spend it. He signaled that he's ready _ or, rather, that he has a duty _ to tackle big challenges. And that he wants Republicans to walk with him in that endeavor. But he also indicated that he has core beliefs on which he won't compromise. Like the notion that government can be a tool _ not THE tool _ for solving what ails the nation. And the need to curb climate change. And the fact that all people are created equal, regardless of gender, race or sexual orientation. And, finally, that you don’t always have to see the world the same way to get things done. In doing so, he's suggesting that he has a responsibility to press his agenda even if the deeply divided nation _ and its equally fractured leaders _ refuse to heed his call to come together to address the nation's problems."


    For continuing rolling coverage, check out our Inauguration Watch.
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